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The Georgetown guide to Arabic-English translation / Mustafa Mughazy.

By: Mughazy, Mustafa, 1974-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, 2016Description: ix, 295 p. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 9781626162792.Subject(s): Arabic language -- Translating into English | Translating and interpreting -- Philosophy | | Humanities, English November2018Genre/Form: -- Reading bookDDC classification: 428.02927
Contents:
Getting words across : word-level translation problems and strategies -- Putting words together : phrase-level translation problems and strategies -- Inside the sentence : functional categories -- The sentence and beyond -- Annotated texts -- Answer key -- Appendix 1. Arabic acronyms and abbreviations -- Appendix 2. Conjunctive frozen expressions -- Appendix 3. Adverbial frozen expressions -- Appendix 4. Exocentric compounds -- Appendix 5. Noun-adjective collocations -- Appendix 6. Verb-object collocations -- Appendix 7. Light verbs -- Appendix 8. Common expressions in business correspondence.
Summary: Mughazy, a well-respected scholar of Arabic linguistics and a Georgetown Languages board member, takes a practical approach to the task of translating nonfiction from Arabic to English. Using Optimality Theory from linguistics, he provides a new way, based in linguistics, of looking at best practices for translation with the goal to find the most accurate translation. He aims to approach translation more scientifically (identify the problem, test hypotheses, selecting the best option and finding patterns) than those who use the more widely known literary translation theory. Although there are several books out on this topic, none address it as Mughazy has. This is a unique approach that offers a new, more practical way for those with advanced knowledge of Arabic to learn how to translate. As more schools begin or consider beginning translation programs, this book may find a larger audience over the years. Mughazy's book is rich with authentic examples, exercises (answer key included), and includes very valuable appendices for the learner. As Clara told me, "This is a book I wish I had had in grad school."
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book - (Non borrowing) Book - (Non borrowing) Central Library
Second Floor
Baccah 428.02927 MUG (Browse shelf) Not for loan 000043802
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
Second Floor
Baccah 428.02927 MUG (Browse shelf) Available 000043803
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
Second Floor
Baccah 428.02927 MUG (Browse shelf) Available 000043804
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 289-290) and index.

Getting words across : word-level translation problems and strategies --
Putting words together : phrase-level translation problems and strategies --
Inside the sentence : functional categories --
The sentence and beyond --
Annotated texts --
Answer key --
Appendix 1. Arabic acronyms and abbreviations --
Appendix 2. Conjunctive frozen expressions --
Appendix 3. Adverbial frozen expressions --
Appendix 4. Exocentric compounds --
Appendix 5. Noun-adjective collocations --
Appendix 6. Verb-object collocations --
Appendix 7. Light verbs --
Appendix 8. Common expressions in business correspondence.

Mughazy, a well-respected scholar of Arabic linguistics and a Georgetown Languages board member, takes a practical approach to the task of translating nonfiction from Arabic to English. Using Optimality Theory from linguistics, he provides a new way, based in linguistics, of looking at best practices for translation with the goal to find the most accurate translation. He aims to approach translation more scientifically (identify the problem, test hypotheses, selecting the best option and finding patterns) than those who use the more widely known literary translation theory. Although there are several books out on this topic, none address it as Mughazy has. This is a unique approach that offers a new, more practical way for those with advanced knowledge of Arabic to learn how to translate. As more schools begin or consider beginning translation programs, this book may find a larger audience over the years. Mughazy's book is rich with authentic examples, exercises (answer key included), and includes very valuable appendices for the learner. As Clara told me, "This is a book I wish I had had in grad school."

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