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Muslim minorities and citizenship : authority, communities and Islamic law / Sean Oliver-Dee.

By: Oliver-Dee, Sean, 1970-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Publisher: London ; New York : I. B. Tauris, 2012Description: vii, 240 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781848853881; 1848853882.Subject(s): Islamic law -- Non-Islamic countries | Muslims -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Non-Islamic countries | Citizenship (Islamic law) | Law -- Great Britain -- Colonies -- History | Law -- France -- Colonies -- History | | BAEPS, Political Science October2018DDC classification: 323.65088297 Online resources: Table of contents only
Contents:
Historical and theological background. State, citizenship and the law: Islamic theology and history ; Anglo-French imperial interaction with Islam: historical contextualisation. -- Islam in minority: citizenship and the Ummah. Should Muslims always obey those in Authority over them, even when they are not muslims? ; From Ijtihad to Khilafah state: on what level should the notion of the Muslim community function? -- Islam in minority: Shari'a and the state. The introduction of Shari'a into British imperial India: issues and questions ; French imperial interaction with Shari'a ; The New World: Citizenship, Identity and the New Europe.
Summary: "The issues of citizenship, identity and cohesion have rarely been as vital as they are today. Since the events of 9/11 and subsequent terrorist episodes in Bali, Madrid, London and elsewhere, focus in this area has centred primarily upon Muslim minority communities living in the West. This book examines the question of citizenship and loyalty, drawing on the historical contexts of Muslim minorities living under British and French imperial rule in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and looks at how shari'a functioned within the context of imperial civil code. It draws important comparisons that are of immense relevance today, and engages with current debates about the compatibility of Islamic law with civil law in non-Islamic societies. Engaging with both Muslim minority and government perspectives, this is important reading for scholars, students, commentators and policy-makers concerned with the question of Western engagement with its own minorities."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
First floor
MERIC 323.65088297 OLI (Browse shelf) 000292 Available 000043234
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages [190]-237) and index.

Historical and theological background. State, citizenship and the law: Islamic theology and history ; Anglo-French imperial interaction with Islam: historical contextualisation. -- Islam in minority: citizenship and the Ummah. Should Muslims always obey those in Authority over them, even when they are not muslims? ; From Ijtihad to Khilafah state: on what level should the notion of the Muslim community function? -- Islam in minority: Shari'a and the state. The introduction of Shari'a into British imperial India: issues and questions ; French imperial interaction with Shari'a ; The New World: Citizenship, Identity and the New Europe.

"The issues of citizenship, identity and cohesion have rarely been as vital as they are today. Since the events of 9/11 and subsequent terrorist episodes in Bali, Madrid, London and elsewhere, focus in this area has centred primarily upon Muslim minority communities living in the West. This book examines the question of citizenship and loyalty, drawing on the historical contexts of Muslim minorities living under British and French imperial rule in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and looks at how shari'a functioned within the context of imperial civil code. It draws important comparisons that are of immense relevance today, and engages with current debates about the compatibility of Islamic law with civil law in non-Islamic societies. Engaging with both Muslim minority and government perspectives, this is important reading for scholars, students, commentators and policy-makers concerned with the question of Western engagement with its own minorities."--Publisher's website.

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