Banner

MIMO processing for 4G and beyond : fundamentals and evolution / edited by Mario Marques da Silva, Francisco A. Monteiro.

Contributor(s): Silva, Mario Marques da [editor.] | Monteiro, Francisco A [editor.]
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boca Raton : CRC Press / Taylor & Francis Group, c.2014Description: xviii, 533 p. : ill. ; 24 cmISBN: 9781466598072 (hardback)Subject(s): MIMO systems | | Engineering, General Engineering, Electrical May2015Genre/Form: -- Reading book DDC classification: 621.38456 Summary: "Multiple-input multiple-output was from the beginning a disruptive idea which opened horizons to up-until-then unimaginable data rates and system capacities in wireless systems. This book offers a fresh look at MIMO signal processing, namely its detection (including in the frequency domain) and precoding. It also looks at its combination with OFDM, UWB and CDMA and the impact at the system-level. MIMO remains a pillar of high-speed systems beyond 4G which incorporate massive MIMO and network coding at the physical layer and these topics are also addressed. The book brings together some highly cited authors from first-class institutions. "--Summary: "Preface: Evolution of Wireless Systems--The Roots of MIMO and its Future In the transmission of information over a wireless channel the channel is modeled classically as a linear system black box with an input and output, that is, a single input and a single output (SISO). The input is the connection point from the power amplifier of the transmitter to the transmitting antenna terminal and the output is the connection point from the receiving antenna terminal to the radio frequency (RF) front-end filter of the receiver. The antennas are modeled as a structure that radiates EM waves that propagate through space. The simplest such antenna structure is a radiating electric dipole element. With the presence of multipath propagation in the channel it becomes evident that the electric field at the receiver location undergoes variations in amplitude over distances in space in the order of a wavelength. As a result, variations of the classical wireless channel were employed, where multiple receiving antenna elements were introduced, or in other words, antenna structures with multiple interconnection points to the receiver. These antennas were designed to achieve the so-called receiver diversity. The channel could then be modeled as having a single input and multiple outputs, or in the current terminology SIMO (single input multiple output). Classical receiver techniques to process the multiple outputs were referred to as combining techniques"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
First floor
Baccah 621.38456 MIM (Browse shelf) Available 000038334
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
First floor
Alahram 621.38456 MIM (Browse shelf) 329 Available 000038210
Total holds: 0

Index : p. 515-533.

Includes bibliographical references.

"Multiple-input multiple-output was from the beginning a disruptive idea which opened horizons to up-until-then unimaginable data rates and system capacities in wireless systems. This book offers a fresh look at MIMO signal processing, namely its detection (including in the frequency domain) and precoding. It also looks at its combination with OFDM, UWB and CDMA and the impact at the system-level. MIMO remains a pillar of high-speed systems beyond 4G which incorporate massive MIMO and network coding at the physical layer and these topics are also addressed. The book brings together some highly cited authors from first-class institutions. "--

"Preface: Evolution of Wireless Systems--The Roots of MIMO and its Future In the transmission of information over a wireless channel the channel is modeled classically as a linear system black box with an input and output, that is, a single input and a single output (SISO). The input is the connection point from the power amplifier of the transmitter to the transmitting antenna terminal and the output is the connection point from the receiving antenna terminal to the radio frequency (RF) front-end filter of the receiver. The antennas are modeled as a structure that radiates EM waves that propagate through space. The simplest such antenna structure is a radiating electric dipole element. With the presence of multipath propagation in the channel it becomes evident that the electric field at the receiver location undergoes variations in amplitude over distances in space in the order of a wavelength. As a result, variations of the classical wireless channel were employed, where multiple receiving antenna elements were introduced, or in other words, antenna structures with multiple interconnection points to the receiver. These antennas were designed to achieve the so-called receiver diversity. The channel could then be modeled as having a single input and multiple outputs, or in the current terminology SIMO (single input multiple output). Classical receiver techniques to process the multiple outputs were referred to as combining techniques"--

There are no comments for this item.

to post a comment.