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Be the best bad presenter ever : break the rules, make mistakes and win them over / Karen Hough.

By: Hough, Karen.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: San Francisco : Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc, c.2014Edition: 1st. ed.Description: viii, 145 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781626560475 (pbk.).Subject(s): Public speaking | Business communication | BAEPS, Business Administration Generalities March2015 | Business presentationsGenre/Form: -- Reading bookDDC classification: 658.452
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: So Who Said You're a Bad Presenter? -- Respected Rules for Speaking and Why You Should Break Them - Mercilessly -- Section I: The Baddest Way to Prepare - Start Breaking the Rules Before You Even Hit the Stage -- Rule to Break #1: Your purpose is to give a good presentation -- Rule to Break #2: Informational presentations are good -- Rule to Break #3: Picture the audience in their underwear -- Rule to Break #4: Practice in front of a mirror -- Section II: You are the Presentation - So Be Your Baddest You -- Rule to Break #5: Open with an introduction and close with questions -- Rule to Break #6: You either have confidence or you don't -- Rule to Break #7: What you say is most important -- Rules to Break #8 and 9: Scan the back wall to simulate eye contact and Stand behind the podium -- Rule to Break #10: Use bullet points to clarify your topic -- Rule to Break # 11: Have all information on the PowerPoint slides -- Section III: Oops! - Staying Bad, No Matter What Happens -- Rule to Break #12: If something goes wrong, act like nothing happened -- Rule to Break #13: If nervous, hold the clicker to mask the shake -- Rule to Break #14: Control your emotions at all times -- (Now Get Out There and Be Your Bad Self!).
Summary: " One reason public speaking is such a nightmare for so many people is that they think they have to be "perfect." They drive themselves crazy trying to conform to all sorts of handed-down rules that tie them up in knots and put their audiences to sleep. Karen Hough says you can throw out those rules, relax, be yourself, make "mistakes," and connect with your audience much more effectively than the guy with the impeccable PowerPoint slides. Hough has used her unique presentation approach to take the anxiety out of one of the greatest fears in business. Her book debunks over a dozen myths about presentations to make them more fun and natural for everybody. It's authenticity and passion that win people over, not polish. But you can't be authentic if you're following someone else's rules. Hough shows how you can embrace your own style and communicate your message without worrying constantly about antiquated dos and don'ts. Follow Karen's "bad advice" and you'll be surprised to learn you're actually a naturally skilled presenter"--Summary: "Everything you think you know about presentations is turned on its head in this funny, wise, and immensely useful book. We can't learn to become good presenters if we're terrified of being bad. So, revel in your imperfections and learn what's really important about presenting: being yourself"--
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book - Borrowing Book - Borrowing Central Library
First floor
Baccah 658.452 HOU (Browse shelf) Available 000037714
Total holds: 0

Machine generated contents note: So Who Said You're a Bad Presenter? -- Respected Rules for Speaking and Why You Should Break Them - Mercilessly -- Section I: The Baddest Way to Prepare - Start Breaking the Rules Before You Even Hit the Stage -- Rule to Break #1: Your purpose is to give a good presentation -- Rule to Break #2: Informational presentations are good -- Rule to Break #3: Picture the audience in their underwear -- Rule to Break #4: Practice in front of a mirror -- Section II: You are the Presentation - So Be Your Baddest You -- Rule to Break #5: Open with an introduction and close with questions -- Rule to Break #6: You either have confidence or you don't -- Rule to Break #7: What you say is most important -- Rules to Break #8 and 9: Scan the back wall to simulate eye contact and Stand behind the podium -- Rule to Break #10: Use bullet points to clarify your topic -- Rule to Break # 11: Have all information on the PowerPoint slides -- Section III: Oops! - Staying Bad, No Matter What Happens -- Rule to Break #12: If something goes wrong, act like nothing happened -- Rule to Break #13: If nervous, hold the clicker to mask the shake -- Rule to Break #14: Control your emotions at all times -- (Now Get Out There and Be Your Bad Self!).

" One reason public speaking is such a nightmare for so many people is that they think they have to be "perfect." They drive themselves crazy trying to conform to all sorts of handed-down rules that tie them up in knots and put their audiences to sleep. Karen Hough says you can throw out those rules, relax, be yourself, make "mistakes," and connect with your audience much more effectively than the guy with the impeccable PowerPoint slides. Hough has used her unique presentation approach to take the anxiety out of one of the greatest fears in business. Her book debunks over a dozen myths about presentations to make them more fun and natural for everybody. It's authenticity and passion that win people over, not polish. But you can't be authentic if you're following someone else's rules. Hough shows how you can embrace your own style and communicate your message without worrying constantly about antiquated dos and don'ts. Follow Karen's "bad advice" and you'll be surprised to learn you're actually a naturally skilled presenter"--

"Everything you think you know about presentations is turned on its head in this funny, wise, and immensely useful book. We can't learn to become good presenters if we're terrified of being bad. So, revel in your imperfections and learn what's really important about presenting: being yourself"--

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